The Foundation was featured on NBC 5 Chicago’s Making a Difference segment with LeeAnn Trotter.

nbc-video

Take Deep Breaths and Move Forward.

Between exams, essays, friends, family, extracurriculars, finances, and worries about the future, we know that life for a college student can be stressful. So, relax, take a few breaths (tip #1!), and spend a few minutes managing stress.


Deep Breaths

Feeling overwhelmed? Panicked? Anxious? Give yourself a moment to regain composure. Take deep breaths, talk to a friend, or go for a walk. When you feel your mind starting to race, take a moment and do whatever works for you to calm down and keep moving forward.

Break It Down

Break down bigger tasks into smaller, more manageable pieces, or break down longer periods of time into goal-oriented steps. Pick one thing to focus on at a time, and make mini-goals that build toward the big goals. Even though the to-do list may be long, with each task you check off, you’ll see that you’re making definite progress and find it easier to stay motivated.

Simplify, Simplify, Simplify

Are you doing too much? Reassess your activities and course load. How do they contribute to your goals? Is being involved in too many activities causing you to sacrifice the quality of your work or shirk responsibilities? Focusing your time on fewer things may be less stressful and more rewarding than juggling many things half-heartedly. Keep doing what is essential and exciting, but make sure you’re not biting off more than you can chew.

Keep on Movin’

Staying active reduces stress. You don’t need to run a marathon or lift 3 times your body weight, but regularly doing a moderate activity (going for a walk) will get your blood moving and make you feel better.

Catch Some Zzz’s

Sleep also decreases stress. Despite what the college culture often implies, getting enough sleep is possible! Although it may be more difficult during busier weeks, making sure you sleep enough has a big positive impact on your physical and mental health.

Go Pro

Whether you want to vent about day-to-day stress or have heavier matters to discuss, consider reaching out to  professionals for help. They are unbiased, confidential experts on stress who have trained for years to know how to best help you. Get to know your school’s mental health resources. Often, colleges provide counseling services for free or at low-cost to their students.

Take Deep Breaths and Move Forward.

Between exams, essays, friends, family, extracurriculars, finances, and worries about the future, we know that life for a college student can be stressful. So, relax, take a few breaths (tip #1!), and spend a few minutes managing stress.


Deep Breaths

Feeling overwhelmed? Panicked? Anxious? Give yourself a moment to regain composure. Take deep breaths, talk to a friend, or go for a walk. When you feel your mind starting to race, take a moment and do whatever works for you to calm down and keep moving forward.

Break It Down

Break down bigger tasks into smaller, more manageable pieces, or break down longer periods of time into goal-oriented steps. Pick one thing to focus on at a time, and make mini-goals that build toward the big goals. Even though the to-do list may be long, with each task you check off, you’ll see that you’re making definite progress and find it easier to stay motivated.

Simplify, Simplify, Simplify

Are you doing too much? Reassess your activities and course load. How do they contribute to your goals? Is being involved in too many activities causing you to sacrifice the quality of your work or shirk responsibilities? Focusing your time on fewer things may be less stressful and more rewarding than juggling many things half-heartedly. Keep doing what is essential and exciting, but make sure you’re not biting off more than you can chew.

Keep on Movin’

Staying active reduces stress. You don’t need to run a marathon or lift 3 times your body weight, but regularly doing a moderate activity (going for a walk) will get your blood moving and make you feel better.

Catch Some Zzz’s

Sleep also decreases stress. Despite what the college culture often implies, getting enough sleep is possible! Although it may be more difficult during busier weeks, making sure you sleep enough has a big positive impact on your physical and mental health.

Go Pro

Whether you want to vent about day-to-day stress or have heavier matters to discuss, consider reaching out to  professionals for help. They are unbiased, confidential experts on stress who have trained for years to know how to best help you. Get to know your school’s mental health resources. Often, colleges provide counseling services for free or at low-cost to their students.

Take Deep Breaths and Move Forward.

Between exams, essays, friends, family, extracurriculars, finances, and worries about the future, we know that life for a college student can be stressful. So, relax, take a few breaths (tip #1!), and spend a few minutes managing stress.


Deep Breaths

Feeling overwhelmed? Panicked? Anxious? Give yourself a moment to regain composure. Take deep breaths, talk to a friend, or go for a walk. When you feel your mind starting to race, take a moment and do whatever works for you to calm down and keep moving forward.

Break It Down

Break down bigger tasks into smaller, more manageable pieces, or break down longer periods of time into goal-oriented steps. Pick one thing to focus on at a time, and make mini-goals that build toward the big goals. Even though the to-do list may be long, with each task you check off, you’ll see that you’re making definite progress and find it easier to stay motivated.

Simplify, Simplify, Simplify

Are you doing too much? Reassess your activities and course load. How do they contribute to your goals? Is being involved in too many activities causing you to sacrifice the quality of your work or shirk responsibilities? Focusing your time on fewer things may be less stressful and more rewarding than juggling many things half-heartedly. Keep doing what is essential and exciting, but make sure you’re not biting off more than you can chew.

Keep on Movin’

Staying active reduces stress. You don’t need to run a marathon or lift 3 times your body weight, but regularly doing a moderate activity (going for a walk) will get your blood moving and make you feel better.

Catch Some Zzz’s

Sleep also decreases stress. Despite what the college culture often implies, getting enough sleep is possible! Although it may be more difficult during busier weeks, making sure you sleep enough has a big positive impact on your physical and mental health.

Go Pro

Whether you want to vent about day-to-day stress or have heavier matters to discuss, consider reaching out to  professionals for help. They are unbiased, confidential experts on stress who have trained for years to know how to best help you. Get to know your school’s mental health resources. Often, colleges provide counseling services for free or at low-cost to their students.

On May 29th, 2014 Pullman Scholars participated in the first-ever Pullman Scholar Symposium that offered panel discussions, networking opportunities, and career development workshops designed to give them the tools needed to thrive during college and beyond. Alumni, board members, and volunteers joined the scholars for an evening of networking and to hear keynote Pullman Scholar Alumnus Steven Fair speak about how his definition of how success has changed since college.

We’d like to extend our gratitude to the Pullman Scholar Symposium Planning Committee, our associates board, and other volunteers who worked hard to make our first symposium a success. THANK YOU!

2014-05-29 20.05.13 2014-05-29 19.56.11 2014-05-29 19.55.59 2014-05-29 17.56.01 2014-05-29 17.53.50 2014-05-29-19.58.29_web 2014-05-29 19.43.25 2014-05-29 19.42.51 2014-05-29 19.40.18 2014-05-29 19.34.21 2014-05-29 18.55.55 2014-05-29 18.35.08 2014-05-29 18.26.57 2014-05-29 18.22.29 2014-05-29 17.57.54

 

How to Write a Professional Bio as a College Student.

A well-written bio is a great tool to have in your professional toolkit. Whether for a job application, networking event, or as an introduction for future employers, your bio is a great way to share who you are and highlight your accomplishments. It can also be a great addition to your LinkedIn profile’s “Summary” section.

Depending on your year in college, your biography will vary in length and topics. For example, a senior may have more work or internship experience to write about than a first-year student, and can describe his/her job roles, skills, and professional interests. On the other hand, first-year students could focus their bio on their background, educational goals, and hobbies. In both cases, your bio should craft an engaging narrative that emphasizes your interests and personality.

Format

Bios are written in the third person and are typically one or two paragraphs, depending on your level of experience. Your bio should start with your name and a quick sentence that describes your basic background. This can include your college, year in school, academic focus, and professional interest. Your bio should be brief, concise, and clear.

Establish a Background Story

Highlighting your background will give the reader an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of your personal narrative, which may not be evident on your resume. Also, consider including recent events, such as studying abroad or volunteering. Find a couple of moments in your life that have impacted your identity or interests, and briefly, mention them. This will personalize your bio and help you stand out from your peers.

Explain Your Interests

Next, you will want to elaborate on your interests. For students with a significant amount of professional experience, this will focus more on career goals. If you don’t feel you have enough job experience to write about or are not sure about your professional goals, describe your academic or extracurricular interests. Feel free to add any hobbies that highlight your uniqueness, such as painting, running marathons, or cooking. Remember, your personal biography is an area to describe your personality that is not as easily communicated on your resume.

Emphasize How You Can Add Value

Lastly, you want to end on a high note by emphasizing how you can add value. Depending on where you use this bio, this sentence or two can refer to adding value to a company, team, or event. Highlight your unique talents and skills that would interest your audience. Rather than explicitly stating, “I can add value by…,” share this message subtly. You want your reader to understand that you are a well-rounded individual and professional who can contribute significant knowledge and experience.

There is no order to include all of this information. Play with the format and see what works best for your narrative. Although it can be difficult to summarize your life in one paragraph, this is a useful tool for crafting a positive image of yourself for potential professional networks. Below are two examples:

Example 1 (for first-years and sophomores):

Alison Johnson is finishing her first year at DePaul University where she is interested in business. Although she has yet to declare a major, she’s considering finance or marketing. After watching her parents run a restaurant for years, she knew at a very young age that she also wanted to go into business. In high school, Alison waited tables at the family restaurant during the summer and was fascinated by the many working parts it takes to operate a successful business. From this experience, she learned the value of hard work, efficiency, and communication. In the future, she hopes to continue her parents’ legacy and run her own five-star restaurant in downtown Chicago. Alison spends her spare time singing in her church choir and cooking for friends and family.

Example 2 (for juniors and seniors):

Jared Smith is a senior at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where he is majoring in International Studies with a concentration in Latin America. His interest in international development began during the fall semester of 2012 when he had the opportunity to study abroad in Peru. He learned about the inequalities affecting indigenous communities, experienced the Peruvian culture, and became proficient in Spanish. Inspired by this international experience, Jared interned with the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, conducting research on food security in Latin America. Jared aspires to pursue a career in international development and write policy for a government agency. When he is not busy reading about current affairs in Latin America, he enjoys playing intramural basketball and training for the Chicago marathon.

 

More Resources

4 Steps to Writing a Professional Bio, Huffington Post

How to Write a Professional Bio, PROF KRG

6 Must-haves for Writing a Compelling Professional Bio, People Results

For many high school seniors and college students, ushering in the New Year isn’t only about the party hats, sparklers, and resolutions, it also rings in the FAFSA season (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). First-time FAFSA tacklers and even those who’ve completed the form several years in a row can feel the process is overwhelming and confusing.

The good news is that the Federal Student Aid office of the Department of Education has created helpful resources, including infographics, videos, how-to’s, FAQ’s, and articles to navigate you through the process.

If you don’t think you qualify for federal or state aid or you aren’t sure, a great first step is to verify your eligibility. And, there’s NO income cut-off for federal student aid. Everyone who is eligible should fill out the FAFSA. Follow the handy infographic below to get started on your FAFSA journey.

The Financial Aid Process

by FederalStudentAid.
Explore more infographics like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

 

By Julia Lane, Intern.

It wasn’t too long ago that a classmate of mine was out biking around Uptown on a beautiful summer day in Chicago. Later that evening she developed a fever, and the next day she began having trouble breathing. After being rushed to the ER and spending a week in the ICU she emerged from the hospital with a list of prescriptions to treat acute pneumonia and a medical bill, the price of which could easily buy a nice four-bedroom house on the north side.

It turns out her student medical insurance expired a day before she was admitted to the ER. Like most college students, my friend was healthy and wasn’t planning on an extended trip to the hospital, so she hadn’t thought about renewing her medical insurance. While you might feel the same way, unless you’ve been living under a rock for the last two years, you probably also know that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will require all individuals to sign up for health insurance by January 1, 2014 (even if coverage doesn’t kick in until later).  How will this new law affect you? What are your options?

If you’re lucky enough to have a job that pays for medical insurance, stop reading now. You’re covered – go enjoy that free flu shot! If you’re like the average college student, who doesn’t have a job but might need health insurance, then read on and be prepared to be prepared.

ACA Quiz Infographic

Option 1: Your Parents’ Insurance Plan is your New BFF (at least until you’re 26).

Are you under 26? Do your parents have non-Medicare insurance? Hurray! Under the ACA, almost all students are eligible to stay on their parents’ healthcare plan until they’re 26! Even students that are married, financially independent, or no longer live with their parents are eligible.

Peer Pressure

According to the Commonwealth Fund 2013 Health Insurance Tracking Survey, 15 million young adults ages 19–25 enrolled in or stayed on their parents’ health plan in past year. That’s a lot of people staying on their parents’ insurance!

Will it hurt?

Staying on your parents’ insurance could save you a lot of money.  For example, student health insurance at the University of Chicago will cost you $2,757 per year (that’s not including dental or vision, btw). However, there are several things to consider before staying on your parents’ plan. Going to college out of state? Check to see if your parents’ insurance has local providers in their network. Out-of-network doctors can be ridiculously expensive. Also, check to see what your parents’ plan covers, many students have to pay extra for dental, vision, or maternity coverage.

Option 2: Let’s Go Shopping… for Insurance Plans!

Does your college or university offer student health insurance? Awesome, you’re already covered! The medical insurance plan offered by your college or university will satisfy the requirement that individuals have health insurance starting in 2014. Also, check out this infographic for more information about the requirement to buy coverage under the ACA.

What if you can’t afford your university’s health insurance? If your state has expanded its Medicaid program and you earn around $10,000 or less per year, you can qualify for free or low-cost health insurance for Medicaid.

The Perks of Being Broke

Medical insurance is expensive and the government recognizes that it may not be a feasible option for everyone in certain circumstances. If you’re are not fully employed and earn less than $10,000 a year, then you may have the option to not sign up for insurance through the ACA.

Option 3: Too Cool for Insurance?

You like to live dangerously, taking a chance on paying for the ER out of pocket is such a rush! Maybe you’re following in the footsteps of Thoreau and aren’t going to let the government dictate what you spend your money on (man, that guy was a rebel). Whatever the reason, if you are eligible and don’t sign up for insurance by January 1, 2014, the new health care law may require you to pay a penalty.

But for the next year, it won’t be much: $95 or 1 percent of your taxable income whichever is more. However, the penalty will increase after the first year of the program so watch out for fee increases. And, once open enrollment closes on March 31, 2014, if you haven’t signed up yet, you won’t be able to do so until the next open enrollment period.

Bottom line: Health insurance is complicated, but learning more about your options by talking to your parents and school will help you save money and ensure you’ve got the best medical plan for your needs.

Sources: www.healthcare.govhttp://www.commonwealthfund.orghttp://kff.org; http://kff.org/interactive/subsidy-calculator/