The Foundation was featured on NBC 5 Chicago’s Making a Difference segment with LeeAnn Trotter.

nbc-video

Bonnie Miller, the Foundation’s board president, was featured as March 2015’s Remarkable Woman in the Chicago Tribune. Read the full article here.

“Before Bonnie became president, we were doing good work,” said Robin Redmond, the foundation’s executive director. “But she had the foresight to see a greater potential. Now, we can help more students.” Bonnie Miller is a hands-on president, she added, known in the boardroom as “a sharp cookie with a wicked sense of humor.”

Five Pullman Scholar Alumni share how the Pullman Foundation impacted their lives.

“I am a graduate of Wendell Phillips High School (in Chicago’s Bronzeville neighborhood) and Northwestern University. I grew up in the Ida B. Wells Homes and the Clarence Darrow Homes (former public housing projects in Bronzeville ). I am one of seven children and the first to attend college. Without the Pullman Scholarship I would not have been able to afford to finish college. I went on to receive a master’s from Boston University and a J.D. (juris doctor, a law degree) from Boston College. I recently retired from serving as a juvenile court judge after 20 years.”

-Leslie Harris, J.D., Northwestern University

“My mother’s family arrived in northern Indiana from Holland in the late 1850s to find fertile farmland ideal for starting their new life as American farmers. But as often happens, the first generation after their arrival decided to break out in many directions, a few of whom ended up on the south side of Chicago working for Pullman. I don’t have all the details of what jobs they performed, or whether they lived in Pullman houses or shopped at the Pullman stores, or if they were around for the famous strike, but I do know they settled there for generations. Even in my childhood in the 1970s, we used to visit many of my older relatives that still lived in Roseland.

In the late 1980s, I benefited from Mr. Pullman’s foundation, whose scholarship helped fund my undergraduate education at Bucknell University from 1988-92. More than a century after my first ancestors began working for the Pullman Palace Car Company, his legacy was still having an impact on my family and me. Today, I work with the Foundation donating my time, financial support and expertise to help ensure that legacy continues for the next generation of worthy scholars from Cook County. In the end, some may view George Pullman as a heartless capitalist exploiting workers, but that narrow view misses the dramatic influence this early Chicago industrialist had on our city, our culture and on the lives of thousands of people in Chicagoland and around the world – an influence that extends long beyond the life of George Pullman or the company he founded.”

-Jeff Tryka, CFA, ’92, Bucknell University

“In 1970, I was one of the fortunate recipients of a Pullman Foundation scholarship which allowed me to attend Washington University in St. Louis. Having grown up on the south side of Chicago I am proud of this Foundation and its mission.  I am impressed with the caliber of students who are selected for these awards and only wish that there were more funds available to support more students in their academic endeavors.  The daughter of George Pullman has created a wonderful legacy in memory of her father.”

– Margaret Marek Rohter, MPH,CPHA,LEHP, ’73, Washington University in St. Louis

“The Pullman Scholarship could not cover the cost of tuition at Northwestern, but their gift certainly made a difference to me in so many other ways. They made me feel important and worthy. Their gift was a form of unanticipated support that came when I needed support the most. That support has stuck with me 40 years later, inspiring me to start my own foundation – an arts foundation, which aspires to inspire others, and impact them in a way that makes them feel the way that the Pullman Foundation made me feel.”

-Andrea J. Fulton, ’83, Northwestern University

“My grandfather came to the U.S. before the turn of the 20th century and was employed as a tradesman at the Pullman works in Roseland. Although I never knew him, my father always talked about the Pullman factory, the lay-out of the community and the splendor of the Hotel Florence.

During my youth I was surrounded by the Pullman community. Mendel CHS (formerly Pullman Tech) was school to many of my friends. Gatley Stadium was home to most of my high school football games. The shadows of the Pullman factories were a constant reminder of the powerful empire that was once in my backyard.

Fortunately, the Pullman legacy has continued through the Pullman Educational Foundation. The Foundation was there for me when I needed financial assistance for my college education. As a direct relative of a Pullman Co. employee I was able to qualify for a Pullman Scholarship. I received 4 years of aid which significantly eased the financial burden on me and my parents.

Today, my two children receive financial assistance from the Pullman Foundation for their college education. We now have 4 generations that have benefited from the Pullman legacy stretching over 12 decades.”

-Richard J. Meliska, C.P.A., ’74, MacMurray College

By Shawn J. Mayberry, Guest Blogger, Pullman Scholar Alumnus.

In 2011, I graduated from Loyola University Chicago with my communications degree. It was the most exciting (and scariest!) time of my life. With scholarships and other money saving strategies, I graduated with less than $15,000 in student loan debt at a private university with an annual price tag of $45,000.

Unlike most Pullman Scholars, I had attended Harry S. Truman College, a two-year community college, prior to transferring to Loyola University Chicago. I was awarded the Pullman Foundation Scholarship as part of a pilot partnership program with another organization I was a part of.

Higher education is one of your biggest life investments, and like any good investor, you want to cut costs and save money wherever possible. Here are a few tips I pulled from my experience to help you minimize your student loan debt:

  • Stick to your courses: There may be a class or two that you sign up for and realize it is more difficult than you expect or that you just can’t meet the workload demand. In all four years of college, I never dropped one course. I stuck through some of the hardest courses because I didn’t want to waste my money or time – two very valuable things. Before starting a course, ask your peers if they have taken the course or know anybody that has. You can also check out sites like Rate My Professors, where students give feedback on courses and professors.

 

  • Study abroad, smartly. I had the pleasure of sitting with fellow Pullman Foundation Scholars at our Winter Celebration in December (you missed a great event if you weren’t able to make it!), and I was amazed at all of the alternative ways students found to study abroad. While I really wanted to study abroad, I feared all of the costs and the loans I would have to borrow, but I still wanted that valuable experience. Instead of spending three to four months abroad, I spent time in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico through a Jesuit program at my university. I met a lot of amazing people and heard incredible stories of people’s plight to better economic opportunities. It was life changing. For the whole experience, I only spent about $250, and they covered everything else, including food, room and board, and air travel. If you do decide to study overseas, try and cut costs as much as possible. Look for cheaper flights on sites like Student Universe, apply for scholarship programs, and make sure you will receive credits for your studies abroad. You would hate to take out student loans only to realize that you won’t receive credit and then have to extend your stay in school or take classes over the summer, all costs you can avoid.

 

  • Apply for scholarships. It can be time-consuming juggling school, work, and other extracurricular activities, but see if you can dedicate an hour or two to searching and applying for new scholarships every other week or so. You can search for scholarships on sites like Big Future, Scholarships.com, and many others.

 

  • Secure a job, if possible, through work-study, which gives you the opportunity to make money on campus, usually in environments that allow you to study during your shifts. I worked in the Communications Department of my university where I not only made long-lasting connections and gained valuable experience (I was featured on the university website and in marketing collateral), but I was able to make money. If you are able to strike a good balance between classes, studying, and work, you can get great experience and earn extra money regardless of whether you work on or off campus.

 

  • Become an R.A. Full disclosure: the only debt I am paying off is a year of living expenses at our downtown Chicago campus. After I realized the cost, I immediately applied to be a Resident Assistant. Not only is your room and board covered, but you might also receive a meal allowance and a stipend every semester. It’s also a productive way to build connections with other students and gain great experience.

 

  • Cut spending on your books. Textbooks can be a huge expense in college. Exchange books with friends who have the same classes as you, and check to see if the school and public library carry any of the books. Sometimes I would go to my professor to see if the book was mandatory or if they had a loaner I could use periodically. You can also try renting books or purchase used books at lower prices.

I wish you the best of luck in 2015, throughout your college career, and beyond. Ask me questions and keep in touch with LinkedIn and @ShawnMayberry on Twitter.

Shawn_Mayberry_thumbnailShawn currently works at an advertising agency and is also pursuing entrepreneurial endeavors helping small businesses maximize their online and digital advertising dollars. He enjoys spending time with his cockapoo named Princess, staying fit at the gym, writing calligraphy, gardening, reading random articles, and volunteering on two associates boards, including the Pullman Foundation Associates Board.

By Shawn J. Mayberry, Guest Blogger, Pullman Scholar Alumnus.

In 2011, I graduated from Loyola University Chicago with my communications degree. It was the most exciting (and scariest!) time of my life. With scholarships and other money saving strategies, I graduated with less than $15,000 in student loan debt at a private university with an annual price tag of $45,000.

Unlike most Pullman Scholars, I had attended Harry S. Truman College, a two-year community college, prior to transferring to Loyola University Chicago. I was awarded the Pullman Foundation Scholarship as part of a pilot partnership program with another organization I was a part of.

Higher education is one of your biggest life investments, and like any good investor, you want to cut costs and save money wherever possible. Here are a few tips I pulled from my experience to help you minimize your student loan debt:

  • Stick to your courses: There may be a class or two that you sign up for and realize it is more difficult than you expect or that you just can’t meet the workload demand. In all four years of college, I never dropped one course. I stuck through some of the hardest courses because I didn’t want to waste my money or time – two very valuable things. Before starting a course, ask your peers if they have taken the course or know anybody that has. You can also check out sites like Rate My Professors, where students give feedback on courses and professors.

 

  • Study abroad, smartly. I had the pleasure of sitting with fellow Pullman Foundation Scholars at our Winter Celebration in December (you missed a great event if you weren’t able to make it!), and I was amazed at all of the alternative ways students found to study abroad. While I really wanted to study abroad, I feared all of the costs and the loans I would have to borrow, but I still wanted that valuable experience. Instead of spending three to four months abroad, I spent time in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico through a Jesuit program at my university. I met a lot of amazing people and heard incredible stories of people’s plight to better economic opportunities. It was life changing. For the whole experience, I only spent about $250, and they covered everything else, including food, room and board, and air travel. If you do decide to study overseas, try and cut costs as much as possible. Look for cheaper flights on sites like Student Universe, apply for scholarship programs, and make sure you will receive credits for your studies abroad. You would hate to take out student loans only to realize that you won’t receive credit and then have to extend your stay in school or take classes over the summer, all costs you can avoid.

 

  • Apply for scholarships. It can be time-consuming juggling school, work, and other extracurricular activities, but see if you can dedicate an hour or two to searching and applying for new scholarships every other week or so. You can search for scholarships on sites like Big Future, Scholarships.com, and many others.

 

  • Secure a job, if possible, through work-study, which gives you the opportunity to make money on campus, usually in environments that allow you to study during your shifts. I worked in the Communications Department of my university where I not only made long-lasting connections and gained valuable experience (I was featured on the university website and in marketing collateral), but I was able to make money. If you are able to strike a good balance between classes, studying, and work, you can get great experience and earn extra money regardless of whether you work on or off campus.

 

  • Become an R.A. Full disclosure: the only debt I am paying off is a year of living expenses at our downtown Chicago campus. After I realized the cost, I immediately applied to be a Resident Assistant. Not only is your room and board covered, but you might also receive a meal allowance and a stipend every semester. It’s also a productive way to build connections with other students and gain great experience.

 

  • Cut spending on your books. Textbooks can be a huge expense in college. Exchange books with friends who have the same classes as you, and check to see if the school and public library carry any of the books. Sometimes I would go to my professor to see if the book was mandatory or if they had a loaner I could use periodically. You can also try renting books or purchase used books at lower prices.

I wish you the best of luck in 2015, throughout your college career, and beyond. Ask me questions and keep in touch with LinkedIn and @ShawnMayberry on Twitter.

Shawn_Mayberry_thumbnailShawn currently works at an advertising agency and is also pursuing entrepreneurial endeavors helping small businesses maximize their online and digital advertising dollars. He enjoys spending time with his cockapoo named Princess, staying fit at the gym, writing calligraphy, gardening, reading random articles, and volunteering on two associates boards, including the Pullman Foundation Associates Board.

By Shawn J. Mayberry, Guest Blogger, Pullman Scholar Alumnus.

In 2011, I graduated from Loyola University Chicago with my communications degree. It was the most exciting (and scariest!) time of my life. With scholarships and other money saving strategies, I graduated with less than $15,000 in student loan debt at a private university with an annual price tag of $45,000.

Unlike most Pullman Scholars, I had attended Harry S. Truman College, a two-year community college, prior to transferring to Loyola University Chicago. I was awarded the Pullman Foundation Scholarship as part of a pilot partnership program with another organization I was a part of.

Higher education is one of your biggest life investments, and like any good investor, you want to cut costs and save money wherever possible. Here are a few tips I pulled from my experience to help you minimize your student loan debt:

  • Stick to your courses: There may be a class or two that you sign up for and realize it is more difficult than you expect or that you just can’t meet the workload demand. In all four years of college, I never dropped one course. I stuck through some of the hardest courses because I didn’t want to waste my money or time – two very valuable things. Before starting a course, ask your peers if they have taken the course or know anybody that has. You can also check out sites like Rate My Professors, where students give feedback on courses and professors.

 

  • Study abroad, smartly. I had the pleasure of sitting with fellow Pullman Foundation Scholars at our Winter Celebration in December (you missed a great event if you weren’t able to make it!), and I was amazed at all of the alternative ways students found to study abroad. While I really wanted to study abroad, I feared all of the costs and the loans I would have to borrow, but I still wanted that valuable experience. Instead of spending three to four months abroad, I spent time in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico through a Jesuit program at my university. I met a lot of amazing people and heard incredible stories of people’s plight to better economic opportunities. It was life changing. For the whole experience, I only spent about $250, and they covered everything else, including food, room and board, and air travel. If you do decide to study overseas, try and cut costs as much as possible. Look for cheaper flights on sites like Student Universe, apply for scholarship programs, and make sure you will receive credits for your studies abroad. You would hate to take out student loans only to realize that you won’t receive credit and then have to extend your stay in school or take classes over the summer, all costs you can avoid.

 

  • Apply for scholarships. It can be time-consuming juggling school, work, and other extracurricular activities, but see if you can dedicate an hour or two to searching and applying for new scholarships every other week or so. You can search for scholarships on sites like Big Future, Scholarships.com, and many others.

 

  • Secure a job, if possible, through work-study, which gives you the opportunity to make money on campus, usually in environments that allow you to study during your shifts. I worked in the Communications Department of my university where I not only made long-lasting connections and gained valuable experience (I was featured on the university website and in marketing collateral), but I was able to make money. If you are able to strike a good balance between classes, studying, and work, you can get great experience and earn extra money regardless of whether you work on or off campus.

 

  • Become an R.A. Full disclosure: the only debt I am paying off is a year of living expenses at our downtown Chicago campus. After I realized the cost, I immediately applied to be a Resident Assistant. Not only is your room and board covered, but you might also receive a meal allowance and a stipend every semester. It’s also a productive way to build connections with other students and gain great experience.

 

  • Cut spending on your books. Textbooks can be a huge expense in college. Exchange books with friends who have the same classes as you, and check to see if the school and public library carry any of the books. Sometimes I would go to my professor to see if the book was mandatory or if they had a loaner I could use periodically. You can also try renting books or purchase used books at lower prices.

I wish you the best of luck in 2015, throughout your college career, and beyond. Ask me questions and keep in touch with LinkedIn and @ShawnMayberry on Twitter.

Shawn_Mayberry_thumbnailShawn currently works at an advertising agency and is also pursuing entrepreneurial endeavors helping small businesses maximize their online and digital advertising dollars. He enjoys spending time with his cockapoo named Princess, staying fit at the gym, writing calligraphy, gardening, reading random articles, and volunteering on two associates boards, including the Pullman Foundation Associates Board.

Take Deep Breaths and Move Forward.

Between exams, essays, friends, family, extracurriculars, finances, and worries about the future, we know that life for a college student can be stressful. So, relax, take a few breaths (tip #1!), and spend a few minutes managing stress.


Deep Breaths

Feeling overwhelmed? Panicked? Anxious? Give yourself a moment to regain composure. Take deep breaths, talk to a friend, or go for a walk. When you feel your mind starting to race, take a moment and do whatever works for you to calm down and keep moving forward.

Break It Down

Break down bigger tasks into smaller, more manageable pieces, or break down longer periods of time into goal-oriented steps. Pick one thing to focus on at a time, and make mini-goals that build toward the big goals. Even though the to-do list may be long, with each task you check off, you’ll see that you’re making definite progress and find it easier to stay motivated.

Simplify, Simplify, Simplify

Are you doing too much? Reassess your activities and course load. How do they contribute to your goals? Is being involved in too many activities causing you to sacrifice the quality of your work or shirk responsibilities? Focusing your time on fewer things may be less stressful and more rewarding than juggling many things half-heartedly. Keep doing what is essential and exciting, but make sure you’re not biting off more than you can chew.

Keep on Movin’

Staying active reduces stress. You don’t need to run a marathon or lift 3 times your body weight, but regularly doing a moderate activity (going for a walk) will get your blood moving and make you feel better.

Catch Some Zzz’s

Sleep also decreases stress. Despite what the college culture often implies, getting enough sleep is possible! Although it may be more difficult during busier weeks, making sure you sleep enough has a big positive impact on your physical and mental health.

Go Pro

Whether you want to vent about day-to-day stress or have heavier matters to discuss, consider reaching out to  professionals for help. They are unbiased, confidential experts on stress who have trained for years to know how to best help you. Get to know your school’s mental health resources. Often, colleges provide counseling services for free or at low-cost to their students.

Take Deep Breaths and Move Forward.

Between exams, essays, friends, family, extracurriculars, finances, and worries about the future, we know that life for a college student can be stressful. So, relax, take a few breaths (tip #1!), and spend a few minutes managing stress.


Deep Breaths

Feeling overwhelmed? Panicked? Anxious? Give yourself a moment to regain composure. Take deep breaths, talk to a friend, or go for a walk. When you feel your mind starting to race, take a moment and do whatever works for you to calm down and keep moving forward.

Break It Down

Break down bigger tasks into smaller, more manageable pieces, or break down longer periods of time into goal-oriented steps. Pick one thing to focus on at a time, and make mini-goals that build toward the big goals. Even though the to-do list may be long, with each task you check off, you’ll see that you’re making definite progress and find it easier to stay motivated.

Simplify, Simplify, Simplify

Are you doing too much? Reassess your activities and course load. How do they contribute to your goals? Is being involved in too many activities causing you to sacrifice the quality of your work or shirk responsibilities? Focusing your time on fewer things may be less stressful and more rewarding than juggling many things half-heartedly. Keep doing what is essential and exciting, but make sure you’re not biting off more than you can chew.

Keep on Movin’

Staying active reduces stress. You don’t need to run a marathon or lift 3 times your body weight, but regularly doing a moderate activity (going for a walk) will get your blood moving and make you feel better.

Catch Some Zzz’s

Sleep also decreases stress. Despite what the college culture often implies, getting enough sleep is possible! Although it may be more difficult during busier weeks, making sure you sleep enough has a big positive impact on your physical and mental health.

Go Pro

Whether you want to vent about day-to-day stress or have heavier matters to discuss, consider reaching out to  professionals for help. They are unbiased, confidential experts on stress who have trained for years to know how to best help you. Get to know your school’s mental health resources. Often, colleges provide counseling services for free or at low-cost to their students.

Take Deep Breaths and Move Forward.

Between exams, essays, friends, family, extracurriculars, finances, and worries about the future, we know that life for a college student can be stressful. So, relax, take a few breaths (tip #1!), and spend a few minutes managing stress.


Deep Breaths

Feeling overwhelmed? Panicked? Anxious? Give yourself a moment to regain composure. Take deep breaths, talk to a friend, or go for a walk. When you feel your mind starting to race, take a moment and do whatever works for you to calm down and keep moving forward.

Break It Down

Break down bigger tasks into smaller, more manageable pieces, or break down longer periods of time into goal-oriented steps. Pick one thing to focus on at a time, and make mini-goals that build toward the big goals. Even though the to-do list may be long, with each task you check off, you’ll see that you’re making definite progress and find it easier to stay motivated.

Simplify, Simplify, Simplify

Are you doing too much? Reassess your activities and course load. How do they contribute to your goals? Is being involved in too many activities causing you to sacrifice the quality of your work or shirk responsibilities? Focusing your time on fewer things may be less stressful and more rewarding than juggling many things half-heartedly. Keep doing what is essential and exciting, but make sure you’re not biting off more than you can chew.

Keep on Movin’

Staying active reduces stress. You don’t need to run a marathon or lift 3 times your body weight, but regularly doing a moderate activity (going for a walk) will get your blood moving and make you feel better.

Catch Some Zzz’s

Sleep also decreases stress. Despite what the college culture often implies, getting enough sleep is possible! Although it may be more difficult during busier weeks, making sure you sleep enough has a big positive impact on your physical and mental health.

Go Pro

Whether you want to vent about day-to-day stress or have heavier matters to discuss, consider reaching out to  professionals for help. They are unbiased, confidential experts on stress who have trained for years to know how to best help you. Get to know your school’s mental health resources. Often, colleges provide counseling services for free or at low-cost to their students.

Whether college is a new acquaintance for you or an old friend, here are nine tips to help you stay safe on campus as the new school year begins:

1. Get to Know Your Campus

Start exploring! A strong knowledge of your surroundings may make you feel safer on campus. Learning the locations of campus emergency phones/buttons, security, etc. and reviewing the safety information your college provides are great first steps in becoming acquainted with your campus.

Pullman Scholars

 2. Safety in Numbers

The old adage, “Safety in numbers,” is important to keep in mind. Walking with a friend from the library, class, or a party is a smart idea. If there isn’t anyone to walk with, don’t hesitate to call campus police for an escort.

Speaking of numbers, it’s also helpful to add the phone number of campus police and a local cab company to your contacts. That way, you’re always prepared!

3. Be Alert

In our digital world, it’s easy to get lost in checking texts, posting on Facebook, or rocking out to the latest hot jam on your phone.  It’s important to pay attention to what’s happening around you. As you are walking, consider putting away your cell phone, taking off your headphones, or keeping the volume low so you can hear what’s going on.

4. Lock your Door

It’s great to feel comfortable in your dorm room or apartment. At the same time, you don’t want your comfort to interfere with your safety. Be sure to lock your door(s) and window(s) when you’re sleeping or away to keep yourself and your valuables safe.

5. Be Aware of Strangers

Meeting new friends is awesome, but remember that it’s important to get to know someone fairly well before you let them hang out in your dorm room. This will ensure that you and your things stay safe!

6. Riding with Drivers Under the Influence is ALWAYS a Bad Idea

Accepting a ride home from a driver who is under the influence of alcohol or drugs is unacceptable in any situation. Always say no to drivers under the influence and don’t hesitate to stop a friend from driving while impaired. Walking with friends or calling a cab are go-to options.

Sober Driver

7. Don’t Take Drinks or Food from Strangers

In a social situation, it’s best to know what’s in anything you are about to consume. Make your own food and drink or watch a person until they’re finished. If you set down a drink for any amount of time, get a new one.

8. Let a Friend Know You’re Leaving

If you’re heading out with different people than the ones you came with, let your friends know you’re leaving, where you’re heading, who you are going with, and when you plan to be home. It’s always helpful (and considerate) to keep everyone informed!

9. Avoid an “It Couldn’t Happen to Me” Attitude

Whatever college you are attending, whatever state you are living in, your personal safety needs to be a priority. Staying alert, being prepared, and taking your safety seriously are important.

More Resources

  • Check out your school’s website to find your campus’ specific safety information.

 

Whether college is a new acquaintance for you or an old friend, here are nine tips to help you stay safe on campus as the new school year begins:

1. Get to Know Your Campus

Start exploring! A strong knowledge of your surroundings may make you feel safer on campus. Learning the locations of campus emergency phones/buttons, security, etc. and reviewing the safety information your college provides are great first steps in becoming acquainted with your campus.

Pullman Scholars

 2. Safety in Numbers

The old adage, “Safety in numbers,” is important to keep in mind. Walking with a friend from the library, class, or a party is a smart idea. If there isn’t anyone to walk with, don’t hesitate to call campus police for an escort.

Speaking of numbers, it’s also helpful to add the phone number of campus police and a local cab company to your contacts. That way, you’re always prepared!

3. Be Alert

In our digital world, it’s easy to get lost in checking texts, posting on Facebook, or rocking out to the latest hot jam on your phone.  It’s important to pay attention to what’s happening around you. As you are walking, consider putting away your cell phone, taking off your headphones, or keeping the volume low so you can hear what’s going on.

4. Lock your Door

It’s great to feel comfortable in your dorm room or apartment. At the same time, you don’t want your comfort to interfere with your safety. Be sure to lock your door(s) and window(s) when you’re sleeping or away to keep yourself and your valuables safe.

5. Be Aware of Strangers

Meeting new friends is awesome, but remember that it’s important to get to know someone fairly well before you let them hang out in your dorm room. This will ensure that you and your things stay safe!

6. Riding with Drivers Under the Influence is ALWAYS a Bad Idea

Accepting a ride home from a driver who is under the influence of alcohol or drugs is unacceptable in any situation. Always say no to drivers under the influence and don’t hesitate to stop a friend from driving while impaired. Walking with friends or calling a cab are go-to options.

Sober Driver

7. Don’t Take Drinks or Food from Strangers

In a social situation, it’s best to know what’s in anything you are about to consume. Make your own food and drink or watch a person until they’re finished. If you set down a drink for any amount of time, get a new one.

8. Let a Friend Know You’re Leaving

If you’re heading out with different people than the ones you came with, let your friends know you’re leaving, where you’re heading, who you are going with, and when you plan to be home. It’s always helpful (and considerate) to keep everyone informed!

9. Avoid an “It Couldn’t Happen to Me” Attitude

Whatever college you are attending, whatever state you are living in, your personal safety needs to be a priority. Staying alert, being prepared, and taking your safety seriously are important.

More Resources

  • Check out your school’s website to find your campus’ specific safety information.

 

Whether college is a new acquaintance for you or an old friend, here are nine tips to help you stay safe on campus as the new school year begins:

1. Get to Know Your Campus

Start exploring! A strong knowledge of your surroundings may make you feel safer on campus. Learning the locations of campus emergency phones/buttons, security, etc. and reviewing the safety information your college provides are great first steps in becoming acquainted with your campus.

Pullman Scholars

 2. Safety in Numbers

The old adage, “Safety in numbers,” is important to keep in mind. Walking with a friend from the library, class, or a party is a smart idea. If there isn’t anyone to walk with, don’t hesitate to call campus police for an escort.

Speaking of numbers, it’s also helpful to add the phone number of campus police and a local cab company to your contacts. That way, you’re always prepared!

3. Be Alert

In our digital world, it’s easy to get lost in checking texts, posting on Facebook, or rocking out to the latest hot jam on your phone.  It’s important to pay attention to what’s happening around you. As you are walking, consider putting away your cell phone, taking off your headphones, or keeping the volume low so you can hear what’s going on.

4. Lock your Door

It’s great to feel comfortable in your dorm room or apartment. At the same time, you don’t want your comfort to interfere with your safety. Be sure to lock your door(s) and window(s) when you’re sleeping or away to keep yourself and your valuables safe.

5. Be Aware of Strangers

Meeting new friends is awesome, but remember that it’s important to get to know someone fairly well before you let them hang out in your dorm room. This will ensure that you and your things stay safe!

6. Riding with Drivers Under the Influence is ALWAYS a Bad Idea

Accepting a ride home from a driver who is under the influence of alcohol or drugs is unacceptable in any situation. Always say no to drivers under the influence and don’t hesitate to stop a friend from driving while impaired. Walking with friends or calling a cab are go-to options.

Sober Driver

7. Don’t Take Drinks or Food from Strangers

In a social situation, it’s best to know what’s in anything you are about to consume. Make your own food and drink or watch a person until they’re finished. If you set down a drink for any amount of time, get a new one.

8. Let a Friend Know You’re Leaving

If you’re heading out with different people than the ones you came with, let your friends know you’re leaving, where you’re heading, who you are going with, and when you plan to be home. It’s always helpful (and considerate) to keep everyone informed!

9. Avoid an “It Couldn’t Happen to Me” Attitude

Whatever college you are attending, whatever state you are living in, your personal safety needs to be a priority. Staying alert, being prepared, and taking your safety seriously are important.

More Resources

  • Check out your school’s website to find your campus’ specific safety information.

 

We are honored to welcome the 65th Class of Pullman Scholars! These 40 exceptional students join 121 returning Pullman Scholars (full list of scholars here) and are pursuing various majors including, English, biomedical engineering, social work, accounting, and many more at 25 different colleges and universities throughout the United States.

As these scholars embark on their college journey, we look forward to our next application season. The 2015 scholarship application will be available on our website in November. If you know any outstanding high school seniors in Cook County, please encourage them to apply!

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On May 29th, 2014 Pullman Scholars participated in the first-ever Pullman Scholar Symposium that offered panel discussions, networking opportunities, and career development workshops designed to give them the tools needed to thrive during college and beyond. Alumni, board members, and volunteers joined the scholars for an evening of networking and to hear keynote Pullman Scholar Alumnus Steven Fair speak about how his definition of how success has changed since college.

We’d like to extend our gratitude to the Pullman Scholar Symposium Planning Committee, our associates board, and other volunteers who worked hard to make our first symposium a success. THANK YOU!

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Informational interviews are conversations with experienced professionals about their jobs, professional development, and career advice. They give you the opportunity to ask meaningful questions to individuals with the first-hand experience in the industries and companies you are interested in.

Why are informational interviews important?
It is helpful to learn from professionals who have gone through the process of finding a job and have experience working in your field of interest. They can be helpful resources as you begin planning your post-graduation life. Informational interviews may also give you insider information on tips, tricks, and guidance for obtaining your dream job. Instead of considering an informational interview as a way to secure a job offer, use it as a learning experience that may be a stepping stone in your career as you gather more information.

Who do you contact for informational interviews?
There are several ways to tap into your network to find people for informational interviews.

Option 1Friends
If you know someone from childhood, high school, or college who has a job you find interesting, reach out! Talking to friends is the easiest and most comfortable way to have an informational interview. If you’ve never done one before, it might be helpful to start off talking with a friend about their job until you become comfortable with approaching someone you don’t know as well.

Option 2: Your College/Alumni Network
Many colleges and universities have online networks where alumni have opted to provide their personal contact information to students of their alma mater. Although it can be slightly nerve-wracking to email a stranger, most alumni are very open to talking with current students about their careers. At the very least, you are connected by the same school, which is a great way to start a conversation! Not sure what resources your campus offers? Contact your career center to find out what’s available.

Option 3: LinkedIn
Your online professional network can be another great resource to ask people about their jobs. Feel free to refer back to our previous LinkedIn blog post if you need tips on how to continue to build your stellar LinkedIn profile. Use your profile to connect with people from companies or organizations you are interested in and see if you can set up a time to speak with them.

Option 4: Networking Events
Attend events on campus or in your city that promote career development. Most college career centers will host events that bring together people from various industries to talk about their jobs. Use these opportunities to connect one-on-one. Many larger cities also provide networking groups in specific industries and interests. Consider joining one to meet new people and increase your exposure to the field.

(more…)

How to Write a Professional Bio as a College Student.

A well-written bio is a great tool to have in your professional toolkit. Whether for a job application, networking event, or as an introduction for future employers, your bio is a great way to share who you are and highlight your accomplishments. It can also be a great addition to your LinkedIn profile’s “Summary” section.

Depending on your year in college, your biography will vary in length and topics. For example, a senior may have more work or internship experience to write about than a first-year student, and can describe his/her job roles, skills, and professional interests. On the other hand, first-year students could focus their bio on their background, educational goals, and hobbies. In both cases, your bio should craft an engaging narrative that emphasizes your interests and personality.

Format

Bios are written in the third person and are typically one or two paragraphs, depending on your level of experience. Your bio should start with your name and a quick sentence that describes your basic background. This can include your college, year in school, academic focus, and professional interest. Your bio should be brief, concise, and clear.

Establish a Background Story

Highlighting your background will give the reader an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of your personal narrative, which may not be evident on your resume. Also, consider including recent events, such as studying abroad or volunteering. Find a couple of moments in your life that have impacted your identity or interests, and briefly, mention them. This will personalize your bio and help you stand out from your peers.

Explain Your Interests

Next, you will want to elaborate on your interests. For students with a significant amount of professional experience, this will focus more on career goals. If you don’t feel you have enough job experience to write about or are not sure about your professional goals, describe your academic or extracurricular interests. Feel free to add any hobbies that highlight your uniqueness, such as painting, running marathons, or cooking. Remember, your personal biography is an area to describe your personality that is not as easily communicated on your resume.

Emphasize How You Can Add Value

Lastly, you want to end on a high note by emphasizing how you can add value. Depending on where you use this bio, this sentence or two can refer to adding value to a company, team, or event. Highlight your unique talents and skills that would interest your audience. Rather than explicitly stating, “I can add value by…,” share this message subtly. You want your reader to understand that you are a well-rounded individual and professional who can contribute significant knowledge and experience.

There is no order to include all of this information. Play with the format and see what works best for your narrative. Although it can be difficult to summarize your life in one paragraph, this is a useful tool for crafting a positive image of yourself for potential professional networks. Below are two examples:

Example 1 (for first-years and sophomores):

Alison Johnson is finishing her first year at DePaul University where she is interested in business. Although she has yet to declare a major, she’s considering finance or marketing. After watching her parents run a restaurant for years, she knew at a very young age that she also wanted to go into business. In high school, Alison waited tables at the family restaurant during the summer and was fascinated by the many working parts it takes to operate a successful business. From this experience, she learned the value of hard work, efficiency, and communication. In the future, she hopes to continue her parents’ legacy and run her own five-star restaurant in downtown Chicago. Alison spends her spare time singing in her church choir and cooking for friends and family.

Example 2 (for juniors and seniors):

Jared Smith is a senior at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where he is majoring in International Studies with a concentration in Latin America. His interest in international development began during the fall semester of 2012 when he had the opportunity to study abroad in Peru. He learned about the inequalities affecting indigenous communities, experienced the Peruvian culture, and became proficient in Spanish. Inspired by this international experience, Jared interned with the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, conducting research on food security in Latin America. Jared aspires to pursue a career in international development and write policy for a government agency. When he is not busy reading about current affairs in Latin America, he enjoys playing intramural basketball and training for the Chicago marathon.

 

More Resources

4 Steps to Writing a Professional Bio, Huffington Post

How to Write a Professional Bio, PROF KRG

6 Must-haves for Writing a Compelling Professional Bio, People Results

For many high school seniors and college students, ushering in the New Year isn’t only about the party hats, sparklers, and resolutions, it also rings in the FAFSA season (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). First-time FAFSA tacklers and even those who’ve completed the form several years in a row can feel the process is overwhelming and confusing.

The good news is that the Federal Student Aid office of the Department of Education has created helpful resources, including infographics, videos, how-to’s, FAQ’s, and articles to navigate you through the process.

If you don’t think you qualify for federal or state aid or you aren’t sure, a great first step is to verify your eligibility. And, there’s NO income cut-off for federal student aid. Everyone who is eligible should fill out the FAFSA. Follow the handy infographic below to get started on your FAFSA journey.

The Financial Aid Process

by FederalStudentAid.
Explore more infographics like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

 

By Julia Lane, Intern.

It’s that time of year again. The air is crisp, couples dressed in J.Crew knits walk down the street consuming pumpkin-flavored beverages, and recent college graduates receive their first student loan repayment bills.

If you graduated this spring and took out loans to fund your education, which according to the College Board’s 2013 Trends in Student Aid is more than half of you, your six-month student loan grace period is probably about to expire. This means  you will be receiving a bill soon which will mark the beginning of your repayment period. Like Batkid’s fight against crime, repayment is no joke, missing a payment could affect your credit score, your ability to rent an apartment or even your eligibility for a job.

Be smart about your repayment. Here are four things you can do now before your first student loan payment is due:

1. Get Organized

It’s probably been several years since you took out your first student loan, and with finals, graduation, and post-college plans you might have become a little hazy about the details. Since you are going to have to start repaying those loans soon, it’s important that you know how much you owe and what kind of loans you have. You can log into the federal government’s student aid website (studentloans.gov) using your Federal Student Aid pin to view your loan balances, information about your loan servicers, interest rates, and more.

2. Say Hello to your Loan Servicer

While you’re on that website, check out who your loan servicer is. A loan servicer is a company that collects your federal student loans payments on behalf of the U.S Department of Education. Once you’ve found out who your loan servicer is, go to their webpage and make sure your contact information is updated. You don’t want your loan bill collecting dust at your mom’s house because you moved over the summer.

3. When Life Gives you Loans, Make Monthly Repayments

So how big of a bill should you be expecting? Your monthly payment will depend on three main things: how much you borrowed, your interest rate, and what kind of repayment plan you choose. For example, the average student who earned a bachelor’s degree in 2011-12 graduated with $26,500 in debt. If their loans had an interest rate of 6.8% and they chose a standard repayment plan of 10 years, then their monthly bill will be almost $300. Overall, they will end up paying a little less than $10,000 in interest over the course of 10 years. In order to make these payments, it is recommended that they have a yearly income of at least $45,000. Take a look at the chart below for more examples.

Table of loan payment estimatesEstimates were made using Mapping your Future’s Student Loan Repayment Calculator 

4. Create a Game Plan for your Repayment Plan

I know, $300 dollars a month is a lot of money, but before you start bulk-buying Top Ramen; you should consider what repayment options you have available to you. For many recent grads, even minimum monthly payments under the standard 10-year repayment plan may be too much to handle at first (we feel your pain theater majors). Luckily, you’ve got repayment options, such as income-sensitive or extended repayment that may lower your monthly bill. While low or reduced monthly payments might mean that you’ll have a little extra cash for fun things, you will end up paying more in the long-run, as unpaid interest is capitalized, increasing your principle loan amount.

Want more information on student loan repayment? Talk to your loan servicer or your college’s student loan officers for more personalized information and repayment options.

Advanced Readings:

Four Common Student Loan Mistakes

Everything You Need to Know about 7 Student Loan Repayment Plans

Federal Student Aid | U.S Department of Education

Income-based Repayment Calculator | Student Aid. gov

Mapping your Future: Estimate your student loan payment

We are excited to present the newest class of Pullman Scholars. These 40 bright, determined, exceptional students continue a legacy of achievement as they join 126 upper-class scholars in their pursuit of earning a college degree. A BIG congratulation to the 64th Class!  We are honored to have you as part of the Pullman Foundation family.

Crystal Bahena, Charles Allen Prosser Career Academy, Parsons The New School for Design

Shaliyah Brown, Charles Allen Prosser Career Academy, DePaul University

Daniel Buss, St. Laurence High School, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Angelica Cabrera, St. Benedict High School, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Charlotte Carroll, Whitney M. Young Magnet High School, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Maritza Chavez, Phoenix Military Academy, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Lisa Cheung, Kenwood Academy, Carleton College

Xiomara Contreras, Concord Academy, Northwestern University

Raisa Cuenca, Noble Street College Prep, Yale University

Ashley Davis, Phoenix Military Academy, Western Illinois University

Gregory English, Morgan Park High School, Howard University

Jennifer Escobar, Lincoln Park High School, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Michael Glynn, Saint Patrick High School, Marquette University

Maribell Heredia, Proviso Mathematics and Science Academy, the University of Illinois at Chicago

Paulena Hopson, Gwendolyn Brooks College Prep Academy, the University of Illinois at Chicago

Loren Hou, Whitney M. Young Magnet High School, University of California, Davis

Nancy Huynh, Frederick Von Steuben Metropolitan Science Center, DePauw University

Brendan Johnson, Harold L. Richards High School, Valparaiso University

Adam Kiolbassa, Holy Trinity High School, Illinois Institute of Technology

Erica Lee, Whitney M. Young Magnet High School, Howard University

Sarah Lin, Whitney M. Young Magnet High School, DePaul University

Casey Luc, Glenbrook North High School, George Washington University

Agona Lutolli, Frederick Von Steuben Metropolitan Science Center, Lake Forest College

Naomi Mang, Hoffman Estates High School, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Shajaya Martinez, Lane Tech College Prep, DePauw University

Lorena Muñoz Ledezma, Cristo Rey Jesuit High School, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Armani Nightengale, Walter Payton College Prep, Loyola University Chicago

Kelsey O’Donnell, John Hersey High School, Northwestern University

Anthony Onyeaghala, Loyola Academy, Illinois State University

Elisabet Ortiz, Lincoln Park High School, University of Colorado Boulder

Erik Ramirez, Phoenix Military Academy, University of Iowa

Erika Reyes, Cristo Rey Jesuit High School, University of San Francisco

Marco Rodriguez, St. Laurence High School, Northwestern University

Josue Salgado, Whitney M. Young Magnet High School, the University of Illinois at Chicago

Huda Shahid, Uplift Community High School, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Memona Shahid, Uplift Community High School, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Maya Stewart, Morgan Park High School, University of Missouri

Bukky Tabiti, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. College Prep, Loyola University Chicago

Juan Velazquez, Elgin High School, University of Notre Dame

Maurice Westbrooks, Fenwick High School, DePaul University